May 2021

What’s Ripe this month? May brings us the first waves of summer fruit. British growers are picking their first ripe strawberries, with raspberries and gooseberries to follow.
From Southern Europe and Turkey, we’ll source the best stone fruit such as apricots, peaches, nectarines, plums and cherries. Don’t forget your veg, either – salads, peas and broad beans are bang in season, too.

Fruit Gift Baskets.

Want to say Thanks, missed a Birthday or just looking after a loved one. Our Fruit and Gifts Baskets  suit all occasions and are a great Gift Idea. Order now to avoid disappointment.

PEACHES

A juicy ripe peach is hard to beat. We
grew up eating the classic round peach
with yellow flesh. Now flat peaches –
known as ‘donuts’ in the trade – are
increasingly popular. Their shape makes
them less messy to eat. White-fleshed
round peaches are also on trend, which
are sweeter but more expensive.

NASHI PEAR

We love the crisp flesh of the nashi pear –
quite unlike the pears we grow here in the
UK. Try them at lunch: chop into slices and
get creative with your salads. They pair
well with nuts and blue cheeses.

NUTS

It’s hard to resist a nibble on our extensive
range of nuts. Mix it up by ordering a
selection of cashews, almonds, pistachios,
walnuts and brazils. We sell nuts raw,
roasted, salted or honey glazed.

CUSTARD APPLE

This exotic fruit is also known as cherimoya. They
get their name from the creamy texture of the
flesh. Discard the seeds when eating. This is one
of our range of exotic fruits, native to a region that
includes Colombia, Ecuador, Peru and Bolivia.

LOQUATS

Also know as nispero, the loquat is a highly
underrated fruit. Mostly grown in Spain, it has
a complex flavour with honey notes. The skin is
edible, too. Loquats are a good source of fibre,
calcium, potassium and vitamin A.

NECTARINES

Just a single gene – responsible for the smooth
skin – separates the nectarine from the peach.
The fruit’s name comes from the word ‘nectar’,
the sweet food or drink of the gods. Four
centuries ago, the first trees were planted here
in Britain – a status symbol for the aristocracy.